Citadel | How Food Halls Are Educational Platforms
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How Food Halls Are Educational Platforms

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How Food Halls Are Educational Platforms

It’s easy to think that food halls are really just a place to eat…especially given the name. A bustling marketplace where people of all ages and places can share in the excitement that can only come with enjoying a delicious handmade meal. But there’s more to these tactile destinations than just filling up a plate with flavors, they’re a portal into experiencing community and witnessing it grow before your eyes. Food halls can teach everyone, from restaurant to patron, many things about the world and here are just a few:

Photo by Pinterest.com

Photo by Pinterest.com

When you’re a new business owner, in this case a restauranteur that might be trying out a first concept, food halls provide a great opportunity to test the market and develop the kind of business strategy that is geared towards success. Marketplaces like ours, coming soon, provide these entrepreneurs with a chance to try a hand at market research to test out dishes and products that work, and get into the swing of things without having to focus on the stresses that come with owning a full brick & mortar.

So while these multiple business owners are getting into the swing of things, whether they’re new to the scene or well-seasoned, they’re also reminded that they’re not going through the growing pains alone. In fact, each and every day they’re surrounded by people experiencing the same process. They have their key to success right next to them. This opens up the floor (or in this case, table) to collaboration which, as we all know, only makes the end result a lot more sweet. Food halls teach business owners that sometimes sharing an idea can make it grow exponentially together.

Because of the varied and wide selection of foods that marketplaces like ours provide, it also creates a great moment for patrons and people of all backgrounds to get comfortable with trying new things. When you go to a restaurant, you’re already sure of what you’re going to eat and probably already know what you’re going to order. But with food halls, the selections are so all-encompassing that for anyone who might be even slightly non-committal, decisions are endless and new flavors are worth exploring.

Photo by Travelandleisure.com

Photo by Travelandleisure.com

On that same note, food halls also push people into new worlds they haven’t yet encountered. We all get used to the things we know well and no one likes change, but when it’s presented to you in a welcoming place like a food hall, you might feel more interested in the back story of where each dish came from and why it’s prepared the way it is. Obscure Japanese dishes, fresh seafood from far corners of the world, these are moments that incite questions and questions bring about answers that shape our understanding of cultures we might not know much about.

Finally, food halls teach people that good quality things take hard work to perfect. When you get to witness something being invented, created and served, you immediately generate a stronger sense of respect for the maker and the process. Marketplaces like these strengthen the tie between consumer and maker, give the makers a platform to show their craft right in the moment and the patron to appreciate what’s on their plate more now that they’ve seen how it’s made.

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Photo by Foodabletv.com.

Cover photo by Timeout.com.